Our Communities

Trail

The City of Trail is the southernmost city on the Columbia River before it crosses the border into the United States. Trail is a historic industrial center having sprung to life as an access to the transportation corridor of the Columbia River and then later to smelt and refine the ores, first obtained from Rossland’s gold mines and later from ore bodies around BC and beyond.

Trail also hosts the main healthcare facility in the West Kootenay Region, Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital as well as numerous sports facilities including the Memorial Centre with a full hockey arena, kid’s rink, and curling sheets, basketball court, and racquetball courts, an aquatic centre, tennis courts, baseball fields, and athletic track, and field house. In addition, the downtown commercial district is undergoing a resurgence, and, with access to the mighty Columbia River and surrounding mountains, hiking, biking, boating and fishing opportunities abound.

  • Population (2016 est.):
    7,709 – 10.949 (including RDKB Areas A & B)
  • Age Demographic Profile:
    
Children (0-14 years):1,060.
    
Emerging Labour Force (15-24 years): 750.
    
Primary Labour Force (25-64): 3,850.
    
Seniors (65+): 2,060
  • Labour Force:
    
Labour Force participation rate: 59.3% (Kootenay Region)
    Average Income: $37,541/year (88.4 % of BC Average) Source: CRA 2014
  • Primary Industry:
    Healthcare

    Social and Gov’t Services
    
Heavy Industrial
    Industrial Services Contracting
    
Retail Sales

    Financial Services

    Emerging Tech and Knowledge sector
  • Major Employers:
    Interior Health Authority (regional)

    FortisBC (regional employer)

    BCGEU (regional employer)
    
Golden Life (regional employer)
    
SD20
    Teck Metals
    Selkirk College (regional)
City of Trail

    RDKB

    Ferarro Foods
    
Walmart
Canada
    Safeway
    
Best Western Columbia River Hotel

    Wood Engineering
    
Kootenay Savings Credit Union

Rossland

The City of Rossland, or the Golden City as it is also known, has a storied past as a turn of the (20th) century boom town, known historically for its gold mines and its early reputation as a centre for downhill skiing, having a number of past residents been recruited to the Canadian National Ski Team, competing and winning medals in international competitions and at the Winter Olympics.

Currently Rossland is becoming increasingly known for its easygoing culture of active lifestyles, with a growing downhill ski tourism industry, cross country and back-country skiing, a rising reputation as a mountain biking mecca, emerging technology industry, and thriving arts community.

  • Population (2014 est.):
    3,650
  • Age Demographic Profile:
    
Children (0-14 years): 655.
    
Emerging Labour Force (15-24 years): 380
    .
Primary Labour Force (25-64): 2,115.

    Seniors (65+): 395
  • Labour Force:
    
Labour Force participation rate: 59.3% (Kootenay Region)
    Average Income: $37,541/year (88.4 % of BC Average) Source: CRA 2014
  • Primary Industry:
    Healthcare
    
Tourism and Hospitality
    Industrial Services Contracting

    Retail Sales

    Emerging Tech and Knowledge sector
  • Major Employers:
    Interior Health Authority (regional)
    
FortisBC (regional employer)
    
Teck Metals
    Red Mountain Ski Resort

    City of Rossland

    Ferarro Foods

Warfield

The Village of Warfield was originally established as a mid-point station for the railway between the mines in Rossland and the smelter in Trail and was named after Carlos Warfield, an associate of Augustus Heinz, the builder of the Trail smelter.

Present day Warfield is a comfortable small community comprised of a wide range of residents from young families to retired seniors. Warfield hosts Webster Elementary, one of the Lower Columbia region’s remaining elementary schools, an outdoor swimming pool, athletic track and field, ball fields, and numerous walking and cycling trails.

  • Population (2011 est.):
    1,700
  • Age Demographic Profile:
    
Children (0-14 years): 280.
    
Emerging Labour Force (15-24 years): 190.

    Primary Labour Force (25-64): 940.
    
Seniors (65+): 280
  • Labour Force:
    
Labour Force participation rate: 59.3% (Kootenay Region)
    Average Income: $37,541/year (88.4 % of BC Average) Source: CRA 2014
  • Primary Industry:
    Healthcare
    
Heavy Industrial
    SD20
    
Industrial Services Contracting

    Retail Sales
  • Major Employers:
    Interior Health Authority (regional)

    FortisBC (regional employer)
    
Teck Metals
    Red Mountain Ski Resort
    
Ferarro Foods

Montrose

The Village of Montrose Originally known as “Wood’s Flats,” Montrose was developed as a retirement village for workers from the nearby Cominco (now Teck) smelter. It was incorporated in 1956 as a village and is named after a popular resort destination in Scotland.

Montrose is a small village, the “Gateway to the Beaver Valley,” with its own post office, restaurant, and gas station/retail, playgrounds and parks, spray park and ball field. The village’s proximity to the amenities of Trail but quiet, small-village, atmosphere make it a popular community for families.

  • Population (2014 est.):
    1,031
  • Age Demographic Profile:
    
Children (0-14 years): 140.
    
Emerging Labour Force (15-24 years): 130.
    
Primary Labour Force (25-64): 565.

    Seniors (65+): 190
  • Labour Force:
    
Labour Force participation rate: 59.3% (Kootenay Region)
    Average Income: $37,541/year (88.4 % of BC Average) Source: CRA 2014
  • Primary Industry:
    Healthcare
    
Heavy Industrial
    SD20
    
Industrial Services Contracting
    
Retail Sales
  • Major Employers:
    Interior Health Authority (regional)

    FortisBC (regional employer)

    Teck Metals

Fruitvale

The Village of Fruitvale is a thriving semi-rural community 16 kilometers east of Trail in the heart of the Beaver Valley with an interesting history. Originally named Beaver Siding in 1893, it was a stop for the Nelson and Fort Sheppard Railway. In 1906 Fruitvale Limited purchased a significant amount of property in the valley and changed the name to Fruitvale to attract settlers and investors. Unfortunately, the growing season in the area wasn’t long enough to successfully produce enough to prosper but people loved the area, and many found work in the lumber industry and at the smelter in Trail.

Fruitvale has grown to embody the small-town feel that many people seek, with a bit more room to move and some properties offering acreages, that has drawn many from the larger towns and cities. Although the lumber industry still acts as a significant driver of the economy in the Beaver Valley, many young families with parents who work in surrounding towns return home to Fruitvale after work to a quieter, family-oriented community, and numerous outdoor recreational opportunities.

  • Population (2015 est.):
    2,064
  • Age Demographic Profile:
    
Children (0-14 years): 315.
    
Emerging Labour Force (15-24 years): 255.
    
Primary Labour Force (25-64): 1,070.
    
Seniors (65+): 360
  • Labour Force:
    
Labour Force participation rate: 59.3% (Kootenay Region)
    Average Income: $37,541/year (88.4 % of BC Average) Source: CRA 2014
  • Primary Industry:
    Healthcare
    
Heavy Industrial
    Industrial Services Contracting
    Lumber/Forestry
    
Retail Sales
  • Major Employers:
    Interior Health Authority (regional)
    
FortisBC (regional employer)
    
BCGEU (regional employer)

    Golden Life (regional employer)
    
SD20 (regional employer)
    Teck Metals
    Atco Wood Products